Kids running around your home means it’s full of love, but it’s also full of toys, messes, and a little bit of chaos. Potential buyers will like seeing a family-friendly home, but they probably won’t appreciate clutter, dirty fingerprints, and spaces cramped with toys. Getting your home ready to sell requires that you deep clean, declutter, and stage your home, and this comes at a price. Thankfully, there are several budget-friendly ways busy parents can get their home showing-ready without spending a fortune (or pulling out too much hair!).

 

Wrangle the Chaos

 

Cleaning your home (and keeping it that way) is an absolute must when you’ll be showing it, but before you can do that, you need to dedicate some serious time and effort to decluttering your spaces. Go room by room, and sort everything into keep, donate, sell, and trash piles. When it comes to the kids’ rooms or any kid-related items you come across that are strewn around the house, it can get a little difficult. Kids aren’t too keen on decluttering and getting rid of their precious items, so motivate them by explaining the happiness their donations can bring to other children. Make it a game and set a timer, or offer a small reward. For the stuff you keep, you’ll need a place to store it. Walmart has a huge selection of storage and organization items for great deals, and you can shop online to easily look for discounts and coupons.

 

Clean Like You Mean It

 

Once the clutter has been wrangled, it’s time to roll up your sleeves and give your home a deep clean. A clean home will make a good first impression on potential buyers, and shows that the home is cared for and maintained. Keep in mind that deep cleaning is different than your typical cleaning routine. You’ll need to dust and wipe down everything from top to bottom. Don’t forget to spruce up the exterior of your home by sweeping off the porch, mowing the grass, and hosing down outdoor furniture. Speed up the process by assigning tasks to the kids, or take advantage of the times when they are away at school or sleeping.

 

Deep cleaning requires a lot of elbow grease, and even more cleaning supplies. You can keep costs down by making a DIY cleaner and using a reusable, washable rag and/or mop to avoid wasting wipes. If you’d prefer ready-made cleaner, opt for the store brand cleaning supplies, such as Smartly by Target – it’s cheaper, but it still gets the job done.

 

Stage Like a Pro

 

Staging your home is the final piece of the puzzle. Instead of shelling out cash for a professional home stager, make small changes that pack the same punch for less money. Small touches can make a world of difference. You could plug in an air freshener, or put out decorative pillows and bath towels from retailers like Macy’s. Pack on the savings by searching for Macy’s in store coupons and promo codes. You want to stage your home so that it appeals to everyone, but don’t forget child-friendly staging as well to appeal to families. Highlight the spaciousness of your home by moving around or removing furniture so that children and pets have plenty of room to roam and play. Put away anything breakable, such as glass vases or top-heavy décor, and replace drapes with child-proof window treatments.

 

Once a showing is scheduled, bake or buy a plate of cookies to leave out in case parents bring their children along. There is plenty of budget- and family-friendly fun in Placer County, CA, so make a list of both indoor and outdoor options to get everyone out of the house when a showing is scheduled.

 

Getting your home ready to sell can be a little hectic, especially when you add kids to the equation. Start by decluttering and cleaning when the kids are away, or recruit them to help. Stage your home so that it is child-friendly, and don’t forget to have an escape plan for when showings are scheduled.

Article By: Kris Louis

Parentingwithkris.com | kristin@parentingwithkris.com

Photo By: Pixabay

This content is not the product of the National Association of REALTORS®, and may not reflect NAR's viewpoint or position on these topics and NAR does not verify the accuracy of the content.